Rushmore

Mt. Rushmore, SD 2006.  David Gardner 2008

Mt. Rushmore, SD 2006. David Gardner 2008

October 11

Cold and snow are increasing here in Rapid City, South Dakota, and we are stuck. Daytime temps are in the 20’s with snow expected – lots of it. We had hoped to stay here only a day, but it has turned into four. The roads are very icy and while we might be OK driving, I just don’t want to chance running into problems in these kinds of conditions. The water in the exit pipe of the grey tank has frozen and I cannot dump it until we get to warmer clines. Unfortunately, it is full and we are rationing our usage. Fortunately, the black and water tank are OK. We will have to hang here until the roads dry. Looks like tomorrow will be the day.

We have come here to visit Mt. Rushmore once again. It is close to the Spearfish area and I wanted to come here again to revisit the monument. I’ve had an image of this place in my Marking project since the beginning, but it was never shot for the project. Instead, I pulled the image out of my files when I began thinking about what should and should not be included. It never really fit the way it was originally shot. As is, it is just too iconic. This is the way we always see this place. It is difficult to differentiate between the icon and how it relates to marking.

George 1. Mt. Rushmore, SD ©David Gardner

George 1. Mt. Rushmore, SD ©David Gardner

Rushmore detail. Mt. Rushmore, WY ©David Gardner

Rushmore detail. Mt. Rushmore, WY ©David Gardner

So I have returned to attempt to take it out of context a bit; to emphasize the marking aspects and show what lengths we go to in order to convey meaning. I don’t mind if the place is still recognizable – in fact, I think it should be. But I want the first thought to be about surface texture and how it changes as a result of man’s touch. It will be interesting to see how quickly – or at all, whether people are still able to pick out where it is. I really love how, in these close-up shots, how the mineral veins and textures of the rock show up. It is an interesting contrast with the man-made workings of the stone. We really don’t see these aspects when viewing from afar and I think it adds new dimension to our perception.

George's Chin. Mt. Rushmore, SD. ©David Gardner

George's Chin. Mt. Rushmore, SD. ©David Gardner


Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s