New Additions

October 15

It’s been very nearly a full month since my last post. It is not for lack of wanting to post – I just really haven’t been able to find, and photograph in a meaningful way, subject matter that fit into the parameters of my project. What I have found in abundance are areas where people have carved their names into whatever surface is available, using whatever tools are available – usually a sharp instrument of some sort. I want more.

Balanced Rocks. Pemigewasset River, NH ©David Gardner 2008

 

 

Balanced Rock, Pemigewasset River, NH ©David Gardner 2008

Balanced Rock, Pemigewasset River, NH ©David Gardner 2008

What I have hoped to find were areas where marks or manipulations of the landscape have been made, and how that place evolves over time. At the core of the project for me was the frustration I have faced in trying to make landscape photographs that don’t include signs of human intervention. It has become more and more difficult to make these kinds of photographs and as a reaction to this, I began this project. So now I am looking for the results of how we alter the landscape. I am looking for variety – for uniqueness in how we mark and come together afterward to add to and embellish it afterward.

Balanced Rocks2, Pemigewasset River, NH  ©David Gardner 2008

Balanced Rocks2, Pemigewasset River, NH ©David Gardner 2008

With this in mind, I am posting a few new images of a place I just came across the past two days. Mary and I were hiking along the Pemigewasset River in New Hampshire this past Columbus day. When we came through an opening in the brush and hit the river, there before us, and stretching out for maybe 30 feet on each side of us, were a series of balanced rocks. There were maybe 50 or more rocks balanced on other larger rocks in the stream. Many were skillfully set and really showed a commitment of time and care. Others were obviously place in a less skillfully way, using sand and small pebbles as wedges and supports to hold up the rock. Again, proximity comes into play here. The originals were seen and the process mimicked.

Balanced Rocks3, Pemigewasset River, NH ©David Gardner 2008

Balanced Rocks3, Pemigewasset River, NH ©David Gardner 2008

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2 Responses to New Additions

  1. Pingback: The Burden Of Perfection (short story) | Lost River

  2. Pingback: The Burden Of Perfection (short story) | Lost River

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